Adam “Ademo” Mueller, a journalist and radio talk show host in New Hampshire, is facing 21 years in prison for his reports on police brutality at a local high school.

It started with a video that a high school student took of another student being apparently manhandled by a police officer in the cafeteria. This video was posted on CopBlock.org, which was co-founded by Mueller. He then followed up on the story in defense of the victim and the teen who recorded the incident, who was told it was “illegal to film” by a school official.

Mueller called a Manchester, NH police captain and the high school’s principal for comment. Ademo’s trouble started when he used audio clips of those interviews on his website, without permission, according to the police and principal.

The state’s wiretap law makes it a crime to record someone without permission if the speaker has “reasonable expectation that what he is saying is not subject to interception,” according to the Union Leader. Mueller says, however, that he identified himself as being from CopBlock.org and sought comment about the incident.

Ademo is now facing charges under the state’s wiretapping laws, but let’s be honest here: if he was on the side of the cops and the school, would he be facing prison time?

The overriding issue here – besides this man’s freedom, of course – is the issue of recording police actions in public places. Why do officials react so vehemently against it? What have they been hiding all these years?

Well, as evidenced by the Rodney King beating all the way to the brutalization of “Occupy” protestors in cities like Oakland, they seem to have a lot to hide. Which is why it is imperative that the recordings continue.

The people who are the most scared of the light of truth are the ones we need to be watching the most.

Joe Klare

About The Author

Joe Klare has been writing about marijuana issues for the past 5 years online, in print and on air.