Paul Stanford – the Executive Director of The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation – wants voters to be able to decide whether or not marijuana is legalized in the state of Oregon in 2012. He currently gathering signatures to get the issue before the voters. Oregon could join California, Colorado, and possibly other states in having legalization questions on the 2012 ballot.

Mr. Stanford needs nearly 90,000 signatures to get the measure on the ballot.

15 Responses

  1. Lynn Berntson

    ny legitimate study will show this to be a bad policy. In the 18th century opium was sold in China for “medical” use allowing England to profit this trade buying from India, selling to China. The result was catastrophic for the Chinese society. The last thing we need is more drug induced thinking.
    “The use of marijuana can produce adverse physical, mental, emotional, and behavioral changes, and – contrary to popular belief – it can be addictive. Marijuana smoke, like cigarette smoke, can harm the lungs.4,5,6 The use of marijuana can impair short-term memory,7,8 verbal skills,9 and judgment10 and distort perception.11,12 It also may weaken the immune system13,14,15,16 and possibly increase a user’s likelihood of developing cancer.14,17 Finally, the increasing use of marijuana by very young teens may have a profoundly negative effect upon their development.9, 18, 19,20

    We hope that this research report will help make readers aware of our current knowledge of marijuana abuse and its harmful effects.”

    Nora D. Volkow, M.D.
    Director
    National Institute on Drug Abuse

  2. malcolm kyle

    Lynn Berntson, I’m afraid your claims concerning China are patently untrue; the Opium trade was aggressively forced upon the Chinese by the western traders, primarily the British.

    In his excellent and comprehensive History of China, John Keay, a professional historian, explains, that if the Chinese had legalized the Opium trade, and taxed it, the drain on China’s silver reserves may have been reversed, leading to a strengthening of the Qing Dynasty.

    http://www.amazon.com/China-History-John-Keay/dp/0007221770

    “In my era everybody smoked and everybody drank and there was no drug use.”
    ~ DEA Chief Thomas Constantine, July 1, 1998

    “Abusus non tollit sum.” [Abuse is no argument against proper use.]
    ~ Latin proverb

  3. malcolm kyle

    Lynn Berntson, I’m afraid your claims concerning marijuana’sadverse effects are also patently untrue.

    Here are just some of the many studies the Feds wish they’d never commissioned:

    01) MARIJUANA USE HAS NO EFFECT ON MORTALITY:

    A massive study of California HMO members funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found marijuana use caused no significant increase in mortality. Tobacco use was associated with increased risk of death. Sidney, S et al. Marijuana Use and Mortality. American Journal of Public Health
    . Vol. 87 No. 4, April 1997. p. 585-590. Sept. 2002.

    02) HEAVY MARIJUANA USE AS A YOUNG ADULT WON’T RUIN YOUR LIFE:

    Veterans Affairs scientists looked at whether heavy marijuana use as a young adult caused long-term problems later, studying identical twins in which one twin had been a heavy marijuana user for a year or longer but had stopped at least one month before the study, while the second twin had used marijuana no more than five times ever. Marijuana use had no significant impact on physical or mental health care utilization, health-related quality of life, or current socio-demographic characteristics. Eisen SE et al. Does Marijuana Use Have Residual Adverse Effects on Self-Reported Health Measures, Socio-Demographics or Quality of Life? A Monozygotic Co-Twin Control Study in Men. Addiction. Vol. 97 No. 9. p.1083-1086. Sept. 1997

    03) THE “GATEWAY EFFECT” MAY BE A MIRAGE:

    Marijuana is often called a “gateway drug” by supporters of prohibition, who point to statistical “associations” indicating that persons who use marijuana are more likely to eventually try hard drugs than those who never use marijuana – implying that marijuana use somehow causes hard drug use. But a model developed by RAND Corp. researcher Andrew Morral demonstrates that these associations can be explained “without requiring a gateway effect.” More likely, this federally funded study suggests, some people simply have an underlying propensity to try drugs, and start with what’s most readily available. Morral AR, McCaffrey D and Paddock S. Reassessing the Marijuana Gateway Effect. Addiction. December 2002. p. 1493-1504.

    04) PROHIBITION DOESN’T WORK:

    The White House had the National Research Council examine the data being gathered about drug use and the effects of U.S. drug policies. NRC concluded, “the nation possesses little information about the effectiveness of current drug policy, especially of drug law enforcement.” And what data exist show “little apparent relationship between severity of sanctions prescribed for drug use and prevalence or frequency of use.” In other words, there is no proof that prohibition – the cornerstone of U.S. drug policy for a century – reduces drug use. National Research Council. Informing America’s Policy on Illegal Drugs: What We Don’t Know Keeps Hurting Us. National Academy Press, 2001. p. 193.

    05) PROHIBITION MAY CAUSE THE “GATEWAY EFFECT”?): U.S. and Dutch researchers, supported in part by NIDA, compared marijuana users in San Francisco, where non-medical use remains illegal, to Amsterdam, where adults may possess and purchase small amounts of marijuana from regulated businesses. Looking at such parameters as frequency and quantity of use and age at onset of use, they found the following: Cannabis (Marijuana) use in San Francisco was 3 times the prevalence found in the Amsterdam sample. And lifetime use of hard drugs was significantly lower in Amsterdam, with its “tolerant” marijuana policies. For example, lifetime crack cocaine use was 4.5 times higher in San Francisco than Amsterdam. Reinarman, C, Cohen, PDA, and Kaal, HL. The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy: Cannabis in Amsterdam and San Francisco. American Journal of Public Health. Vol. 94, No. 5. May 2004. p 836-842.

    06) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART 1):

    Federal researchers implanted several types of cancer, including leukemia and lung cancers, in mice, then treated them with cannabinoids (unique, active components found in marijuana). THC and other cannabinoids shrank tumors and increased the mice’s lifespans. Munson, AE et al. Antineoplastic Activity of Cannabinoids. Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Sept. 1975. p. 597-602.

    07) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER, (PART 2):

    In a 1994 study the government tried to suppress, federal researchers gave mice and rats massive doses of THC, looking for cancers or other signs of toxicity. The rodents given THC lived longer and had fewer cancers, “in a dose-dependent manner” (i.e. the more THC they got, the fewer tumors). NTP Technical Report On The Toxicology And Carcinogenesis Studies Of 1-Trans- Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol, CAS No. 1972-08-3, In F344/N Rats And B6C3F Mice, Gavage Studies. See also, “Medical Marijuana: Unpublished Federal Study Found THC-Treated Rats Lived Longer, Had Less Cancer,” AIDS Treatment News no. 263, Jan. 17, 1997.

    08) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART 3):

    Researchers at the Kaiser-Permanente HMO, funded by NIDA, followed 65,000 patients for nearly a decade, comparing cancer rates among non-smokers, tobacco smokers, and marijuana smokers. Tobacco smokers had massively higher rates of lung cancer and other cancers. Marijuana smokers who didn’t also use tobacco had no increase in risk of tobacco-related cancers or of cancer risk overall. In fact their rates of lung and most other cancers were slightly lower than non-smokers, though the difference did not reach statistical significance. Sidney, S. et al. Marijuana Use and Cancer Incidence (California, United States). Cancer Causes and Control. Vol. 8. Sept. 1997, p. 722-728.

    09) OOPS, MARIJUANA MAY PREVENT CANCER (PART 4):

    Donald Tashkin, a UCLA researcher whose work is funded by NIDA, did a case-control study comparing 1,200 patients with lung, head and neck cancers to a matched group with no cancer. Even the heaviest marijuana smokers had no increased risk of cancer, and had somewhat lower cancer risk than non-smokers (tobacco smokers had a 20-fold increased Lung Cancer risk). Tashkin D. Marijuana Use and Lung Cancer: Results of a Case-Control Study. American Thoracic Society International Conference. May 23, 2006.

    10) MARIJUANA DOES HAVE GREAT MEDICAL VALUE:

    In response to passage of California’s medical marijuana law, the White House had the Institute of Medicine (IOM) review the data on marijuana’s medical benefits and risks. The IOM concluded, “Nausea, appetite loss, pain and anxiety are all afflictions of wasting, and all can be mitigated by marijuana.” The report also added, “we acknowledge that there is no clear alternative for people suffering from chronic conditions that might be relieved by smoking marijuana, such as pain or AIDS wasting.” The government’s refusal to acknowledge this finding caused co-author John A. Benson to tell the New York Times that the government “loves to ignore our report … they would rather it never happened.” Joy, JE, Watson, SJ, and Benson, JA. Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base. National Academy Press. 1999. p. 159. See also, Harris, G. FDA Dismisses Medical Benefit From Marijuana. New York Times. Apr. 21, 2006

  4. In Pursuit Of Happiness

    Well stated Malcolm Kyle – opponents have NO LEGITIMATE lies to spread anymore – so now they are digging back 100, 200 or more years, grasping at straws in hopes of turning pubic opinion back – which simply is NOT GOING TO HAPPEN – The People Have Spoken And Are Still Speaking, and it’s time that our GOVERNMENT started to LISTEN TO THE PEOPLE!. This democracy is supposed to be a Government For The People, NOT AGAINST THEM!

    And a few opponents shall not sway the will of the people – and with the technology we have – I see no further need for politicians other than to put the peoples stamp of approval on legislation. Send them all home, replace them with computers and let the people decide what laws to pass. Repeal Prohibition and bring freedom back to this great nation – Tyranny is not just one man or woman with an iron fist – it can also be a group of them that continuously goes against the majority will of the people … It is clear that prohibition was illegal when enacted, and now 80 years later we’re still fighting to right the wrong. Isn’t it time that we moved forward – and left this all behind us?

  5. Cyberkick

    THERE IS SOMEONE I KNOW HAS BEEN SMOKING POT FOR YEARS, HIS LUNGS ARE STILL PINK! LEGALIZE MARIJUANA TODAY!

  6. Jordan Embree

    The war on drugs has destroyed the lives of millions in this country. People act like it’s insane to legalize marijuana, Nixon’s most relavent legacy is his drug laws; he was great… Do these Stalins think that we can’t think for ourselves? If you are reading this and you support drug prohibition you are an idiot.

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